Thursday, October 26, 2006

I will not name this post "Mad for Plaid!" I will not name this post "Mad for Plaid!" I will not name this post "Mad for Plaid!"


I adore plaid. In fact, if I weren't already in a relationship with a wonderful Latin man, I would find a Scotsman and marry him right away so my wedding would be both gorgeous and trendy. I've been a huge plaid proponent in past posts, as my loyal fans know, describing my passion for the shoes above (by the way, I do hope you've bought them by now, Ms. Lukku) and my hesitant but true love for these.

Sadly, my adoration is being threatened by a disturbing and seemingly contagious epidemic: the infuriating overuse of the phrase, "Mad for Plaid."
Every magazine I open has a Mad for Plaid page. Every fashion website is Mad for Plaid. Nordstrom.com even has a whole Mad for Plaid section. This horrific lack of imagination does not make me Mad for Plaid. It just makes me Mad.

"Mad for Plaid" in and of itself isn't that bad (god please someone stop the rhyming!). Can't we mix it up a bit though? I mean, "plaid" is one of the most rhymable words in our language; are all the great fashion writers and marketers of our time really unable to use, say, "glad" every once in a while? Here. You know what? I'm just gonna take matters into my own hands. I'll show you the ease and the magic of a little rhyme-variety, and soon, like a plaid butterfly flapping its wings in Asia causes a fashion executive in New York to think, "Jesus Christ, can we use anything but 'Mad for Plaid' in our campaign this season?", a revolution will occur. Observe:

Egad! Plaid!

Plaid is Rad!

Plaid's the Fad!

Plaid? Not bad.

and finally...

A Tad of Plaid

See? That wasn't so hard now, was it? And while all those rhymes were still really contrived and slightly annoying (except for the "Egad!" one. I like that one. It's got spunk), they weren't "Mad for Plaid!" And that's all that matters. Now I'll just sit back and wait for the linguistic revolution to begin.


from top: anthropologie, nordstrom.com, katespade.com, girlshop, nordstrom.com, girlshop

14 comments:

marY said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
marY said...

i love the egad! one. it reminds me of mr. lodge from archie comics who was always yelping 'egad!' whenever veronica spent too much money..

londonfashion said...

Really like ur blog please add me to ur links list i have added u to mine

QM said...

Well I am Scottish (no you can't marry me) and when there are articles in British mags about tartan (plaid) we always get "Highland Fling" as the heading. So perhaps you could you use that instead?

Tamron Lohan said...

I FUCKING LOVE those heels... I LOVE them. LOVE THEM, I say!!!!!! God, give me strength.

Alice said...

Oh, the tartan shoes... if I wore them and clicked my heels together three times, would they transport me to Edinburgh? Or even Glasgow? I'd settle for Inverness...

I have to point out that, as the daughter of a Scotsman, the difference between "tartan" and "plaid" was drilled into me at an early age. The former is an officially patterned cloth, made of scratchy wool, denoting a particular Scottish clan. The latter is merely an arbitrary pattern of twill checks, and something to be sneered at by all proper Scottish people.

Unless it's Madras and you're in the tropics - that's different - but I digress.

I can't be sure, but it appears to me that the Divine Footwear may actually be a proper tartan. In which case, we could heave in a headline such as "Tartan It Up" which is so bad it makes my teeth curl.

And no, I haven't bought them. I had to spend my $350 on gas money between Salt Lake and Chicago, not shoes. I assuaged myself by indulging in a pair of round-toe 4" black patent Nine Wests, though. They make me very happy.

Nicky said...

Or you could add a "-y" to it and make it double annoying. Like Daddy loves Plaid-y. Sorry, that was awful! :)

Anonymous said...

Im really not sure about the usage you chose for the word "Latin".
Most would prefer: Hispanic or Mexican.
If you would like me to explain the history of the word and why it does not apply here I would be happy to do that.

-CT

Nicky said...

I'm not sure what the last person who commented meant but my husband is Hispanic and has no problem using Mexican, Latin, Latino, Chicano, etc. to describe his ethnicity. Hence the term Latin America... So I think your words were fine! No worries:)

Alice said...

That is hilarious, and so true! Much kudos for this one, daddy likey.

Ivy Frozen said...

I have a love of plaid and checks too... ::used to wear oversized, plaid button down shirts all the time back in the 90s.:: Of course, I was too young to know about fads. I just liked them. Grabbed them out of the men's department. ::is wearing plaid right now::

QM said...

Lukku, us "proper" Scots sneer at real tartan too! Traditionally it did indeed signify your clan, but most modern Scots either don't belong to any clans, or their clans are unknown, so we now have some tartans which are created for aesthetic or fashion purposes and are not clan specific, therefore more like plaid. And being from Glasgow, if your tartan shoes were to transport you to somewhere then I suggest you make sure they bypass Glasgow, as here your shoes are more likely to get stolen!

Carissa said...

I have fallen deeply in love your style of writing. Its likely that I would read your blog if it were about aeronautics simply to feel the emotion exuding from your words.
Regardless, I also am quite liking plaid, and obviously your revolutionary captions.

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